Acquisition And Cross-Servicing Agreement (Acsa) India Japan

Acquisition And Cross-Servicing Agreement (Acsa) India Japan

In a statement to the press, India`s Foreign Ministry said that Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his counterpart, outgoing Abe Shinzo, “… Agreed that the agreement will further strengthen defence cooperation between the two countries and contribute to peace and security in the Pacific region.┬áIt is interesting to note that the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spoke of the agreement`s ability to enable the Japanese and Indian military to contribute to “international peace and international security,” not to mention in particular a theatre. And we know that this is bland, because unlike other official military logistics agreements in which India participates, the text of the agreement with Japan is accessible to the public via the website of the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. New Delhi: A week before Shinzo Abe`s departure, Prime Minister Narendra Modi spoke of common memories with his “dear friend” and announced the signing of the much-anticipated military logistics agreement. An agreement on mutual supply and services between the armed forces of the two countries was concluded in New Delhi in the run-up to the annual Indojapain summit. The two countries worked hard to conclude this acquisition agreement and cross-service agreement. The date and agenda of the annual India-Japan summit have yet to be set. Similarly, the Indian press release states that the agreement will contribute to “peace and security in the Indo-Pacific region.” Agreements such as the one India has just signed with Japan systematize the process of reciprocal provision of goods and services relevant to the operations of the two military personnel, within pre-defined accounting parameters. This is different from the exchanges that take place ad hoc, as has been the case in the past. It is clear that these agreements are certainly important, but far from being a “military pact” (with all its connotations), as described in the Nikkei Asian Review, except perhaps very literally.

The fact that India and Japan signed this agreement – which has been under negotiation for some time – in the midst of the Indo-Chinese crisis in eastern Ladakh provided an exciting context for a fallacious agreement. With an agreement with France, New Delhi has access to Djibouti, and an agreement with Japan will also help. On 24 August, I stated in these pages that one of the reasons why India`s “fundamental” defence cooperation agreements with the United States – including a logistical agreement – are drawing so much political attention to national territory, because “the texts of these agreements – and even official summaries – continue to serve as suspicion in a country that deeply protects its sovereignty and independent foreign policy.” Indeed, in the absence of a draft agreement on the U.S.-India Logistics Exchange 2016, some analysts have confused it with a “status of forces” agreement on fundamental rights and all that would entail. The Acquisition and Cross-Servicing Agreement (ACSA) is negotiated on a bilateral basis between the United States and its NATO allies or coalition partners, allowing U.S. forces to exchange the most common types of assistance, including food, fuel, transportation, ammunition and equipment. The agreement does not commit a country to take military action. STAs also exist between third countries. Japan and South Korea have both formed ACSAs with countries other than the United States. [1] To date, India has signed military logistics agreements with the United States, France, Australia, South Korea and Singapore.

By signing the pact with Japan, India has concluded a military logistics agreement with all other “quad” countries. In this context, CASA should be seen as a facilitator of greater Indojapain cooperation.


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