Riyadh Agreement On Yemen

Riyadh Agreement On Yemen

STC Vice-President Hani Ben Brik said on Twitter that the suspension of negotiations by the STC was necessary to protest against the “irresponsible behaviour of the parties” towards the Riyadh agreement. Saeed hailed the political forces that “keenly” engaged in the consultations, saying that the implementation of the agreement would unite Yemenis in their battle against the Houthis. The agreement could serve as a means for the STC to consolidate its military and security control over some of the southern governorates. It does not explicitly determine the status of forces dispersing on the west coast, which continue to escape the control of the Ministry of Defence. Nor does it determine the status of Socotra, where tensions between the local government and loyal elements of the STC continue to escalate. This ambiguity may open the door to further clashes, particularly if the STC fails to meet its obligation to withdraw from government camps and buildings or to integrate its troops under the government`s defence and interior ministries.4 The government will not stand idly by and will allow the STC to evade its responsibilities under the agreement. This can lead to outbreaks if we consider that the various poles of regional and partisan politics, which have served as the engines of the violence that has regularly shaken the South, foresee the formation of a new technocratic government with no more than 24 ministers. President Hadi, 4 who has not shown effective leadership in general, repeats the same message in all his statements: that the UN Security Council Resolution 2216 must be basis for any solution and that the Houthi/Iran axis must be defeated. Repeating the main government`s negotiating position and railing against the Houthis are not effective ways of healing the wounds and reaching out to his enemies – something he has rarely done since the conflict broke out in 2014. As he urges the STC to implement the provisions of the agreement, Hadi stresses in the same statement the need to confront “the Houthi-Iranian project in Yemen”. Yemeni author and political researcher Abdel Nasser al-Mouwadea told Al-Monitor: “This agreement has established Saudi Arabia as a guardian state over the southern regions, according to which it will monitor and administer the forces present there, whether separatist forces or those of President [Abed Rabbo Mansour] Hadi. Saudi Arabia will also take care of the merger process and the training of counter-terrorism forces and will determine the missions of these forces and the areas of their deployment.

It considers that “the implementation of the Riyadh agreement has become an inevitable necessity for both sides, and the remaining deadline for its implementation, in accordance with the mechanism announced on 29 July, will reveal the seriousness of the STC in the implementation of the security and military part of the agreement.” Moreover, the timing of the agreement seems indistingals given the complications on the ground and the possibility that Al Qaeda could resume its activities and that the Houthis could try to directly target the agreement.6


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